darksilenceinsuburbia:

Sarah May Studio

Centrefold


“I think the most amazing fact I learned was that they have a part of the brain that we don’t have—a part that we can’t even identify. This suggests that they sense, understand, and even feel more than we do. It still blows me away to think about it.”—Gabriela Cowperthwaite, Director of Blackfish

“I think the most amazing fact I learned was that they have a part of the brain that we don’t have—a part that we can’t even identify. This suggests that they sense, understand, and even feel more than we do. It still blows me away to think about it.”—Gabriela Cowperthwaite, Director of Blackfish

(Source: freedomforwhales, via pocula)

theleoisallinthemind:

Richard Mosse

theleoisallinthemind:

Richard Mosse

(via filthy-hippie-vibes)

baby's first words

http://katelouisepowell.tumblr.com/post/92858375149/the-other-night-i-dreamt-i-was-sat-on-a-beach

katelouisepowell:

The other night I dreamt I was sat on a beach looking out to sea when a small duck came waddling over out of nowhere and sat down beside me. We were there together for a long time in complete silence and absolute peace. I was sat in the wet sand petting this little duck as it climbed into my lap…

(via eclecticpandas)

(Source: choochland, via zeroing)

arquerio:

Viewpoint2 by Madeleine Eve on Flickr.

arquerio:

Viewpoint2 by Madeleine Eve on Flickr.

morigrrl:

Stoke’s Aster

(Source: webuh, via morigrrl)

abigaildonaldson:

W Magazine and Tim Walker adventure to Burma

It is a four-hour train ride from Yangon, the former capital of Burma, followed by an arduous hour-long climb in a retrofitted dump truck, to Golden Rock, a 25-foot-high naturally formed granite boulder so impossibly perched on the edge of a mountain that the only logical explanation for its precarious existence is the Buddhist one. According to lore, a single strand of hair holds the hallowed rock, which is devotionally covered in layers of gold leaf, in place. For Tim Walker, a photographer known for his monumental fantasy-world sets, Burma was the ultimate stage for a shoot. “When they first saw the pictures, people asked if we had built the backgrounds,” he says. “But, in fact, they were beyond anything I could have even imagined.”

Read More

abigaildonaldson:

W Magazine and Tim Walker adventure to Burma

It is a four-hour train ride from Yangon, the former capital of Burma, followed by an arduous hour-long climb in a retrofitted dump truck, to Golden Rock, a 25-foot-high naturally formed granite boulder so impossibly perched on the edge of a mountain that the only logical explanation for its precarious existence is the Buddhist one. According to lore, a single strand of hair holds the hallowed rock, which is devotionally covered in layers of gold leaf, in place. For Tim Walker, a photographer known for his monumental fantasy-world sets, Burma was the ultimate stage for a shoot. “When they first saw the pictures, people asked if we had built the backgrounds,” he says. “But, in fact, they were beyond anything I could have even imagined.”

Read More

(via bau-do-ju)

lvndcity:

anna zelikova

lvndcity:

anna zelikova

afro-dominicano:

Mapping the Mass of an Enormous Galaxy Cluster


  You are looking at the most precise gravity map ever made of a distant galaxy cluster. Using the map, astronomers have determined that the cluster is roughly 650,000 light-years across and contains enough matter to make 160 trillion suns.
  
  Image: ESA/Hubble, NASA, HST Frontier Fields Acknowledgement: Mathilde Jauzac (Durham University, UK and Astrophysics & Cosmology Research Unit, South Africa) and Jean-Paul Kneib (École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Switzerland)
  
  The cluster, known as MCS J0416.1–2403, is located about 4 billion light-years away and consists of hundreds of galaxies all orbiting one another. Newton’s gravitational equations can tell you the mass of two objects orbiting one another, provided you already know the mass of one of them. However, because these galaxies are all so distant, there is no way for scientists to determine any of their individual masses.
  
  But there is another way. Einstein’s theory of general relativity tells us that heavy objects warp the fabric of space-time around them. As light travels through these warped regions it will become distorted, and we see that as smeared out rings and arcs in our telescopes, an effect known as gravitational lensing. Using the Hubble space telescope, astronomers identified smudges in the light seen around MCS J0416.1–2403. These distortions are images of even more distant galaxies sitting behind the cluster; their light has been lensed by its enormous mass. By carefully determining just how much the light is smeared out, researchers can calculate the amount of matter sitting within the galaxy cluster.
  
  The 160 trillion solar masses includes both visible matter and dark matter, which gives off no light but makes up the bulk of the cluster’s mass. By studying the dynamics of all the galaxies within the cluster, astronomers can better understand this mysterious substance. Researchers will also continue mapping the smeared out images to increase the precision of their mass calculations, learning about the cluster’s finer details to figure out its history and evolution.

afro-dominicano:

Mapping the Mass of an Enormous Galaxy Cluster

You are looking at the most precise gravity map ever made of a distant galaxy cluster. Using the map, astronomers have determined that the cluster is roughly 650,000 light-years across and contains enough matter to make 160 trillion suns.

Image: ESA/Hubble, NASA, HST Frontier Fields Acknowledgement: Mathilde Jauzac (Durham University, UK and Astrophysics & Cosmology Research Unit, South Africa) and Jean-Paul Kneib (École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Switzerland)

The cluster, known as MCS J0416.1–2403, is located about 4 billion light-years away and consists of hundreds of galaxies all orbiting one another. Newton’s gravitational equations can tell you the mass of two objects orbiting one another, provided you already know the mass of one of them. However, because these galaxies are all so distant, there is no way for scientists to determine any of their individual masses.

But there is another way. Einstein’s theory of general relativity tells us that heavy objects warp the fabric of space-time around them. As light travels through these warped regions it will become distorted, and we see that as smeared out rings and arcs in our telescopes, an effect known as gravitational lensing. Using the Hubble space telescope, astronomers identified smudges in the light seen around MCS J0416.1–2403. These distortions are images of even more distant galaxies sitting behind the cluster; their light has been lensed by its enormous mass. By carefully determining just how much the light is smeared out, researchers can calculate the amount of matter sitting within the galaxy cluster.

The 160 trillion solar masses includes both visible matter and dark matter, which gives off no light but makes up the bulk of the cluster’s mass. By studying the dynamics of all the galaxies within the cluster, astronomers can better understand this mysterious substance. Researchers will also continue mapping the smeared out images to increase the precision of their mass calculations, learning about the cluster’s finer details to figure out its history and evolution.

(via 90377)

travelingcolors:

La Mangueta beach, Barbate | Spain (by Nacho Coca)

travelingcolors:

La Mangueta beach, Barbate | Spain (by Nacho Coca)

(via plantables)